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[POST AND TELEPHONE] - [THE PRESS] - [RADIO AND TELEVISION] - [TELEINFORMATICS]

The press
Ilona Koivisto and Tiina Tuulasvaara-Kaleva

The most important messages to the people were read to the people for a long time only from the culpit of the church. The city got its first weekly newspaper, ”Sanomia Tampereelta”, in 1866. The paper contained: ”The most curious news and events in Tampere and its neighbourhood, the most important domestic news, but from abroad only the absolutely most significant news, and human interest stories and other reading when there is space in the paper.” The paper got a competitor in 1882, when Finnish nationalist ideas inspired Aamulehti, another newspaper. The turn of the century saw the birth of a multitude of new newspapers, of which the most long-lived was the Social Democrat Kansan Lehti.

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As late as in the 1970s many different political parties published their own papers, and journalistic discussion was lively at the time. One after the other of these have ceased to appear since the 1980s. Tampere boasted the first free distribution paper, Tamperelainen, in the country. Urpo Lahtinen, the founder of the paper, created a business which issued for example the country's leading yellow journal, Hymy, in the 1960s. The music magazine Soundi, published in Tampere, was a special magazine for the youth. Aamulehti developed into the versatile national communication concern Almamedia with a wide production of newspapers, radio and television productions, print and new media productions.
 

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